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The following students qualified for the Dean’s List during the 2018 Fall Term at Mid-Plains Community College. To be eligible, they had to complete 12 or more applicable credit hours of college-level courses and maintain an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 – 3.89 on a 4.0 scale.

 

Nebraska

 

Arcadia - Clay Bauer

 

Arthur - MacKenna Turner

 

Big Springs - Caprice Brown

 

Blair - Mark Starks

 

Brady - Jared Most, Jerry Mull

 

Broken Bow - Ina Bradley, Laurissa Epley

 

Callaway - Grady Lashley, Jessie Parshley

 

Cambridge - Aubri Ross, Kristian Roth

 

Cozad - Karleigh Kleinknecht

 

Culbertson - Beth Hoyt, Emma Matson, Courtney Searcey, Matthew Searcey

 

Curtis - Rylie Brown, Payton Kahler

 

Eddyville - Zachery Jones

 

Enders - Cydney Spady

 

Gering - Kaylee Bohnsack

 

Gothenburg - Tanis Sack, Olivia Williams

 

Grand Island - Vann Stevenson

 

Grant - Logan Cunningham, Whitney Spencer

 

Hastings - Ty Neill

 

Hershey - William Schillinger, Konner Sonneman

 

Imperial - Diana Benitez Aguilar, Taylin McNair, Rogelio Vargas

 

Indianola - Drew Hofman, Alec May, Wyatt McConville, Kayela Parker, Patrick Sughroue, Bethany Vogel

 

Lexington - Katy Esquivel Cruz

 

Loomis - Ethan McKenna

 

Maxwell - Emily Breinig, Jeremy Ochsner

 

McCook - Bradley Ackermann, Jaden Bryant, Zachary Burkey, Taye Collicott, Kyle Geisler, Easton Gillen, Allison Johnson, Steven Keenportz, Halie Lindquist, Nicholas Macfee, Alyson Marin, Trevor Oberg, Mary Osborne, Casey Quagliano, Madison Riemenschneider, Ian Shepherd, Danielle Slaby, Brandon Smith, Ethan Wilcox

 

Memphis - Cody Magness

 

North Platte - Britni Bandy, Rylee Brott, Kayla Bush, Nicholas Bussard, Jamon Davis, Evan DeKok, Taitiana Ditch, Jed Dizmang, Nicholas Doucet, Kelsey Epp, Tyler Floro, Amanda Hanson, Samuel Hergenrader, Makenzi Humphrey, Megan Johnson, Madison Kleewein, Jennifer Lantis, Dasia Lively, Elijah Malsbury, J'Naea Matlock, Kathleen McIntyre, Megan Morash, Brooke Orr, Jade Osborn, Dalton Prokop, Shawn Simpson, Amanda Smith, Seth Smith, Kathryn Smitherman, Samantha Sonneman, Lyndell St. Clair, Brandon Tolle, Eric Travis, Gary White, Ryan White, Kade Wroot

 

Ogallala - John Diaz, Ethan LeGrande

 

Omaha - Tanner Cissell, Ashley Ellingson, Connor McGonigal

 

Paxton - William Babbitt

Stapleton - Brady Baumgartner, Kaylie Beierman, Ashley Houser, John Main

 

Sutherland - Alexandra Baker, Shelly Compton, Ashley Hanneman

 

Thedford - Danya Mintle, Seth Pearson

 

Valentine - Luke Hockenbary, Michelle Witt Moore

 

Wallace - Austin Hanson, Abbey Rohde

 

Walton - Austin Jensen

 

Colorado

 

Aurora - Hannah Jensen

 

Breckenridge - Graham Gaspard

 

Brighton - Makayla Harris

 

Delta - KC Carlson

 

Fleming - Bailey Chintala

 

Greeley - Levi Dart, Hannah Emerson, Isaac Vargas

 

Lakewood - Chanel Siebenthal

 

Littleton - Ashlynn Krueger

 

Windsor - Kali Kelley

 

Wray - Kedric Tufton

 

Florida

 

New Port Richey - Katie Cox

 

Hawaii

 

Makawao - Maysen Medeiros

 

Iowa

 

Council Bluffs - Alea Binkly

 

Kansas

 

Belvue - Reed Murray

 

Effingham - Jade Hollands

 

North Carolina

 

Charlotte - Ngoye Bobmanuel

 

New York

 

Henrietta - Kailee White

 

South Dakota

 

Aberdeen - Karley Martin

 

Texas

 

Houston - Da'May Jones

 

League City - Donta Smith

 

Wyoming

 

Dayton - Angel Richards

 

CANADA

 

Richmond, British Columbia - Kayla Harrison

 

Victoria, British Columbia - Emily Charchuk

 

Brampton, Ontario - Samuel Lebel

 

Gatineau, Quebec - Anthony Kingsbury

 

FINLAND

 

Helsinki - Iftin Mao

 

GERMANY

 

Hamburg - Lena Goerke

 

ITALY

 

Rome - Tommaso Mostarda

 

LATVIA

 

Valmiera - Edgars Kaufmanis

 

NIGERIA

 

Akoka - Chidi Okwarabizie

 

SPAIN

 

Reus - Anna Sanjuan

 

UKRAINE

 

Kiev - Ilya Tyrtyshnik


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CAMBRIDGE, Neb. (AP) — Authorities say four teenagers are facing charges that they planned to attack a high school in south-central Nebraska. Local media reports the Furnas County attorney charged two 18-year-olds and two 17-year-olds with felony terroristic threats related to a plan to attack Cambridge High School on Nov. 30. Court records allege the students had been discussing an attack for months. When one student transferred to a different school, they tried to recruit another student. One student told police he thought the plan was a joke but wasn't sure if the others felt that way. Cambridge Public Schools Superintendent Greg Shepard told local media the school received a call from a parent about a potential threat, prompting it to contact the sheriff's office and state patrol.

 


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An English honor society is now available to students at North Platte Community College.

 

NPCC received national approval for a Sigma Kappa Delta chapter on Tuesday. SKD is the English honor society for two-year colleges, and NPCC is currently the only college in Nebraska to offer it.

 

An inaugural induction ceremony is planned for this weekend.

 

I am thrilled that after a lot of hard work and perseverance on the part of some students who are very dedicated to English and the world of academia, Sigma Kappa Delta is finally coming to fruition,” said Kristi Leibhart, English instructor at NPCC. “Sigma Kappa Delta will open up so many new opportunities for our students and provide another means to reward them for their academic accomplishments.”

 

It’s a goal Leibhart has been working toward for the past two years.

 

“When I was in school, a Sigma Tau Delta chapter was available, which is an English honor society for students at four-year colleges and universities,” said Leibhart. “It was a very visible sign on campus that people were interested in English, and it was a true honor for students to be part of. I wanted to start something similar at NPCC that would reward academics and provide something to aspire to in the classroom.”

 

Leibhart said six members are required to form a SKD chapter. She knows of about 100 individuals at the college who are eligible.

 

“It’s not limited to English majors,” said Leibhart. “Anyone who has completed at least 12 credit hours, who has a minimum GPA of 3.0, who has completed at least one English class and who has received an A or B in every English class can join. Participation doesn’t automatically guarantee induction into Sigma Tau Delta if students transfer on to a four-year institution, but it can make the process easier.”

 

In addition to providing an honor to list on résumés, SKD offers numerous scholarships to its members. There are opportunities to enter writing and photography competitions, present at national conferences and be published in the “Hedera Helix Literary Journal,” the SKD’s official publication.

 

“We plan to do a variety of activities at the local level as well,” Leibhart said. “We would like to conduct community service projects, such as reading to nursing home residents, or collecting books to send to prisoners. Film nights and poetry slams have also been discussed.”

 

The chapter’s induction ceremony is open to the public. It’s scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Dec. 9 in the McDonald-Belton Theater on NPCC’s South Campus.

 

Members will receive green and gold honor cords to wear at commencement as well as a commemorative SKD pin. Refreshments will be provided. 

 

Anyone interested in joining the new honor society can contactLeibhart at leibhartk@mpcc.edu.


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NORTH PLATTE, Neb. — The Nebraska State Patrol says troopers have seized nearly 80 pounds of marijuana in two recent traffic stops on Interstate 80 near North Platte.

The patrol says the first stop occurred Nov. 18, when a trooper stopped a car on suspicion of speeding and veering out of its lane. The patrol says a search of the car turned up 48 pounds of marijuana in luggage. The 27-year-old driver from Jacksonville, North Carolina, was arrested.

The second stop occurred Monday, when a trooper stopped another car on suspicion of failing to signal. A search of that car turned up 30 pounds of marijuana, and a 17-year-old passenger in the car, from California, was arrested and jailed.


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Sheriff Kapperman advises that on October 29 th , 2018 at approximately 9:30 p.m. The Furnas County Sheriff’s Office received a report of drug activity at the Arapahoe Motel in Arapahoe, Furnas County, Nebraska. The Sheriff’s Office responded and had contact with the renters, while talking with them the odor of marijuana was discovered emitting from the apartment. The Sheriff’s Office then applied for a search warrant for the residence for any and all drugs and drug paraphernalia.

The search warrant was granted by Furnas County Court and signed. Entry was made into the residence where three females from South Prairie, Washington where staying, Sonnie Cook, 36, Traci Donnelly, 59 and Veronica Donnelly, 24. Discovered during the search were multiple items of drug paraphernalia, cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, marijuana, prescription pills, a scale and a stamp to mark bags for distribution.
Sonnie Cook, Traci Donnelly and Veronica Donnelly were all placed under arrest for the charges of Possession of Marijuana under 1 oz, Possession of drug paraphernalia, Possession of a controlled substance (heroin, codeine, pills), and Possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute (Methamphetamine, Cocaine).
At the time of this press release no bond has been set.


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Sheriff Kapperman advises that on October 28 th , 2018 at approximately 1:30 p.m theFurnas County Sheriff’s Office received a report of terroristic threats at 720 7 th Street,Beaver City, Nebraska. The reporting party stated that Mark Hutchens, 56, of BeaverCity, Nebraska had fired a b.b gun at her and threatened to burn her house down. Anarrest warrant was filed for Mr. Hutchens for Third degree assault in a menacing manner

and terroristic threats, along with a search warrant for the b.b gun.The arrest warrant and search warrant were granted by Furnas County Court and signed. Entry was made into the residence of Mark and Jennifer Hutchens, 38, of Beaver City,Nebraska. During the execution of the search warrant for the b.b gun, methamphetamineand drug paraphernalia was located along with a shotgun. A second search warrant was obtained to search the residence for drugs, drug paraphernalia and other weapons. Mr. Hutchens is a felon and is prohibited from owning firearms. Additional items of drug paraphernalia, methamphetamine, marijuana and multiple firearms and knives were located in the residence. Jennifer Hutchens was arrested for one count of possession of a control substance (methamphetamine) and possession of drug paraphernalia. Mark Hutchens was arrested for the
arrest warrant and the additional charges of possession of a control substance (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a deadly weapon by a prohibited person and possession of less than one ounce of marijuana.Both Mr. and Mrs. Hutchens appeared in the Furnas County Court and were arraigned on all charges on Monday, October 29 th , 2018, they are due back for preliminary hearing on Monday, November 05 th , 2018. Mr. Hutchens bond was set at $30,000 subject to 10% and Mrs. Hutchens bond was set at $5,000 subject to 10%. At the time of this press release Mrs. Hutchens has bonded out of jail and Mr. Hutchens remains in custody.


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McCook, Nebraska—Congratulations to Ashley Vontz, MSN, APRN, FNP-C, former Community Hospital nurse and new McCook Clinic nurse practitioner, who recently was chosen as one of the Nebraska Action Coalition’s 40 Under 40 honorees.

 

The Nebraska Action Coalition (NAC)-Future of Nursing’s 4th biennial award for emerging nurse leaders provides needed recognition of young nurses across the state. These nurse leaders, all under the age of forty, are the future of nursing, health, and healthcare in Nebraska.

 

Vontz was recognized for her unique contributions to leadership within the nursing profession through: clinical practice, education and teaching, administrative leadership, research, writing/publishing, policy involvement/self-governance, mentoring, and/or healthcare innovation.

 

She received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing through Nebraska Methodist College’s accelerated nursing program in 14 months. She worked as a nurse for the past seven years throughout Nebraska including the Nebraska Heart Institute, Crete Area Medical Center, and most recently, Community Hospital. Vontz recently graduated from the University of Nebraska Medical Center with a Master of Science in Nursing degree. She is Board Certified as a Family Nurse Practitioner.

 

In describing her new role as a nurse practitioner, she said, “I completed the majority of my clinical hours within McCook Clinic. I feel like I have a wonderful relationship with the current providers and staff. I look forward to continue serving McCook and the surrounding communities in a different role. Being born, raised, and still living in rural Nebraska, I have always had a passion caring for the rural population. It is my roots, and I want to continue to ensure those just like my loved ones have access to the best health care possible. I look forward to caring for my patients across the lifespan in the clinic,” she added. She and her husband, Chris, who is the co-superintendent at Heritage Hills Golf Course, have two young sons.

 

She will be honored at an awards celebration during the NAC sponsored Leadership Conference in Lincoln in early November.


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(NORTH PLATTE, NEB.) — Two people were killed in a crash north of McCook on Tuesday, October 9.

The crash occurred at approximately 10:45 a.m. when a 1993 Geo Prizm was traveling northbound on Highway 83 when it crossed the center line and struck a southbound semi nine miles north of McCook.

The driver of the Prizm, William Shanahan, 72, of Maywood, Nebraska, and passenger, Georgia Connor, 64, of Stratton, Nebraska, were both pronounced deceased at the scene. The driver of the semi, Brian Els, was not injured.

The investigation into the crash is ongoing.


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Mosquitos in Red Willow County have tested positive West Nile Virus (WNV) for the second time this summer according to Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department. This follows confirmed positive mosquitos found in Chase County two weeks ago.

 

“West Nile Virus is transmitted to humans by mosquitos. It is important to continue prevention even during the cooler weather.” states Melissa Propp, RN, Surveillance Nurse at SWNPHD. “Use insect repellent which includes at least 30% DEET,” states Propp “DEET in repellent is the most effective prevention to getting bitten by a mosquito.”

 

Additional tips will help prevent mosquito bites:

  • Wear shoes, socks, long sleeve shirts and pants when mosquitos are most active.
  • Install/repair window and door screens.
  • Empty standing water from containers such as gutters, buckets, pool covers, tires.
  • Aerate ponds or stock them with fish.
  • Use larvicide such as mosquito dunks for water that cannot be drained

 

 

Mosquitos rest in dark, humid areas and typically lay their eggs near bodies of water. The use of larvicide to treat water is one method to reduce mosquitoes. Outdoor flying insect repellent may also be utilized to reduce the number of mosquitoes.

 

More information on West Nile Virus may be found at the web site www.swhealth.ne.gov. Or call the McCook office at 308-345-4223, Imperial office at 308-882-4269. Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department is located at 404 West 10th Street – one block north of Arby’s in McCook or 501 Broadway – south entrance in Imperial.

Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department serves Chase, Dundy, Frontier, Furnas, Hayes, Hitchcock, Keith, Perkins and Red Willow counties. You may also follow SWNPHD on Facebook and Twitter.


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State Senator Dan Hughes of District 44, recently sat down with Barbie Long, Director of Community HealthCare and Hospice at her invitation to discuss home health issues. During the interview, Long not only represented the Nebraska Home Care Association, but Community Hospital as well.

 

Long had hoped to take Senator Hughes on a home health visit with a Medicaid patient, but arrangements didn’t work out. She explained to Hughes that the Medicaid patients she sees “really are vulnerable adults or kids” as she discussed the new managed care Nebraska Medicaid program.

 

In responding to the purpose of caring for vulnerable people, Hughes said, “that’s what Medicaid was designed for. No question about that. That’s what government should do; that’s part of what government should be.

 

Long mentioned the hand the Nebraska Healthcare Association has played in working through issues the new Medicaid program has brought by arranging Town Hall meetings. She fears the program may change providers in the future, “and we have to start all over,” giving the example that Well Care just got their patient portal up after a year and half wait.

 

Hughes’ answer to why he was running for re-election was “to finish the job. I’ve learned a lot these past years and I’m still learning things to be a more effective legislator. I’ve invested four years in it already. I don’t like not finishing a job once I start,” he said.

 

The two discussed the broad areas they cover in southwest Nebraska. Senator Hughes, who is form Venango, explained District 44 is “a very big district” covering ten counties: Perkins, Chase, Dundy, Hayes, Hitchcock, Frontier, Red Willow, Gosper Furnas and Harlan. “When I get to Alma, I’m closer to Lincoln than I am to my house,” he said. Long understood the challenges of covering a large area as Community HealthCare and Hospice covers seven of the same counties including Chase, Dundy, Hayes, Hitchcock, Frontier, Red Willow and Furnas.

 

Troy Bruntz, Community Hospital President & CEO, who was also at the table, commented about the hospital’s home health business model, saying other hospitals in southwest Nebraska used to provide home health services. They no longer provide those services because they were losing money. He explained the long drives and time on the road, up to three-hour round trips to see one patient, which don’t make the service profitable. “We lose hundreds of thousands of dollars on home health services each year,” he said.

 

“So why do we do it? Our mission is Regional Healthcare Excellence. If we don’t provide home health services, it isn’t going to be offered in southwest Nebraska, other than maybe our county. But we can’t just focus on Red Willow County if we are going to be a cornerstone for health in the entire region,” he added.

 

He added that since Barbie has become director of the home health department, the amount of patients in home health have doubled and nearly tripled.

 

Community Healthcare and Hospice staffs seven field registered nurses who are also case managers. Long said the field nurses have 17-20 patients each. In addition to Long, department director, Kami Foster, is clinical coordinator. Nursing aides on staff also provide services. “We really are the eyes and the ears of the physician,” she said, “as well as advocates for the patient.”

 

Long added two important reasons for offering home health: The service can help to keep patients from re-admitting into the hospital, and home care is about one tenth the cost of caring for a patient in a facility, such as a hospital. “And we all want to stay home if we can,” she said.

 

Senator Hughes said if elected to a second term, his number one public policy priority will be property taxes, “because that’s what I’m hearing most about. If you look at the demographics of the 44th district, it’s predominantly agriculture. It’s hurting right now because of low commodity prices. The way we fund schools in this state heavily relies on property tax. This has created an intense burden on the ag community.”

 

Bruntz and Long said the ag economy has also affected the hospital financially more than it ever has before. Barbie mentioned knowing some farmers and ranchers with injuries who could not afford seeking medical care due to the extremely high deductibles and co-pays on their medical insurance.

 

They mentioned the hospital offers financial counseling service and social workers to assist people in those situations. Bruntz said the hospital gives away a million and half dollars every year in free and reduced services and is willing to work with patients with medical needs.

 

Hughes said he would consider who steps up to serve on legislative committees before he would consider whether he would change the committees he serves. “There are leadership positions that are vacant that I want to make sure we have the right people in place. If the right people step up, I’m happy to stay where I’m at as chairman of Natural Resources, and Transportation and Telecommunications. I hope to stay on the Exec Board as well,” he said. “I will go where I am needed. I’m a team player and I look at the bigger picture.”

 

Long asked if Senator Hugh’s understanding of the impact of home care services on his constituents has changed since he became a state senator. “I’ve had a little bit of exposure to the doctor side of the issue,” he said. “One of the things I enjoy about being a state senator is I do get to learn about so many things. I have learned a lot and have come to appreciate a lot more of what it takes to make southwest Nebraska work and the state of Nebraska. There are so many things that go on, that unless you are directly involved, you don’t think about.” He added that the more relationships he has, in areas of healthcare for example, if he doesn’t know the answer, he has someone he can call.

 

Bruntz added that “We are always here to help” and that he believes term limits have hurt.

 

Hughes agreed that senators need at least three, four-year terms. “I’ve never liked term limits and now that I’m on the inside, they are even worse than I thought of the devastation it’s done to Nebraska.”

 

Hughes said he is sympathetic to many state issues, but “we just don’t have enough money to go around. “Several areas have taken cuts and they want them back, and I certainly understand that, but the possibility of increased revenue is pretty slim outside of Internet sales tax revenue coming in January.”

 

On a different note, Hughes said he is not in favor of legalizing medicinal marijuana. “I’m in favor of whatever will alleviate suffering, but until the Federal government is willing to do testing to see what works, I can’t in good conscience allow anyone to (use it),” he said. “It’s coming back to the legislature. Every state which has started with medicinal has moved to recreation, but it’s not a path I feel morally we should go down.”

 

Senator Hughes closed the interview by applauding healthcare workers for their dedication to their profession. “Thank you for what you do. It is a critical part of what our society and our corner of Paradise needs so we can all stay here and enjoy life.”


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McCook Humane Society